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Members only - SPPA Conference Poster: ‘Culture, connections and curation for the curious – creativity and challenge!’

PosterResidential Child CareUKYoung People

by Patricia Walls

Kibble works with young people from 5 to 25 years and offers an array of services. We are striving to embed social pedagogy systemically within the organisation as we believe this way of thinking enhances well-being, better outcomes and growth mindsets for all.

To better connect ethos, learning and practice we constantly ask ourselves ‘Why do we do what we do?’ and ‘How can we do it better?’ We offer a variety of platforms to access to inspire curiosity, including online courses, curation, academic modules, taught and experiential learning. We would like to share how social pedagogy can be the thread which connects our strength based learning and practice and how we value being connected to a wider network including ThemPra, SPDN, SPPA, Strathclyde university etc. to support us.

We also gain inspiration for raising curiosity and creativity in the learning environment through the 6-day social pedagogy course as this establishes the environment, opportunities to feel comfortable, allow growth and realise potential.

Our way of thinking and developing framework for planning and facilitating learning ‘Learn it, live it, share it’ resonates with the charter, Item 8 – We value creative and playful approaches to lifelong learning that are theoretically informed, risk sensible and draw on people’s potential.

All of this is not without challenges and we would discuss these and share the positive experiences of what has worked well.

This means that our work is a journey, not a destination….

People with passion: Getting the right people around the table

CreativityUK

by Helen Chambers, Principal Officer for Well-being at National Children's Bureau

In December 2007, the Arts Council England and Creative Partnerships funded an investigation to identify:

• how creativity can be embedded in the lives of the approximately 61,000
children and young people looked after in the care of local authorities
• the role of creativity in the lives of looked after children
• how this work relates to the ideas of social pedagogy as described by the Thomas Coram Research Unit at Institute of Education, London University.

This project with six local authorities and three high quality arts agencies was carried out by NCB between December 2007 and April 2008. This report summarises the project findings.

Richer lives: creative activities in the education and practice of Danish Pedagogues

CreativityInternational

by Helen Chambers, and Prof Pat Pertrie

The report describes a study visit to Denmark, undertaken in May 2008. It will examine the role of creative activities in the training and practice of social pedagogues. Throughout the report, we use the term “creative activities” to refer mainly to the visual and performing arts, while acknowledging that it has a wider application.

A learning framework for artist pedagogues

CreativityUKYoung People

by Helen Chambers, and Prof Pat Pertrie

The National Children’s Bureau (NCB) project manager Helen Chambers and Professor Pat Petrie Director of the Centre for Understanding Social Pedagogy at the Institute of Education have developed a draft learning framework, for artists who work with looked after children, based on learning with three high quality arts organisations. We offer this as a working document for consideration and consultation by commissioners and colleagues nationally.

Fostering a creative relationship

CreativityFoster CareYoung People

by Helen Chambers, and Prof Pat Pertrie

Play and creative activities can help foster carers build warm and caring relationships with looked after children and young people. Looking after other people’s children can sound ordinary but foster carers need to be very creative to engage with and build relationships with looked after children and young people.

Social Pedagogy in the Classroom – Supporting Children and Young People in Care

EducationUKYoung People

by Emma Black, Michael Bettencourt and Claire Cameron

The hypothesis at the heart of this chapter is that you, the target reader of this book, have chosen to enter the teaching profession for a specific reason: you want to make a difference to the lives of the children and young people in your classroom.

As fellow professionals in the education sector, we recognise that demands such as implementing a high stakes accountability-driven curriculum can, without careful consideration, be to the detriment of supporting the emotional needs of the children and young people in your care. Drawing on the work of Cameron, Connelly and Jackson’s (2015) Educating Children and Young People in Care: Learning Placements and Caring Schools, we argue that for children to thrive and flourish, the integration of care and education in daily life is key. We believe this is particularly pertinent to those children and young people who have experienced difficult childhoods. As such, it is these children who are the focus of this chapter. In an effort to support you in establishing and maintaining the synergy between care and education, we present the field of social pedagogy for your consideration.

Child sexual exploitation and mental health – An evaluation on St Christopher’s Services

Mental HealthResidential Child CareUKYoung People

by Dr Nikki Luke, with Prof Judy Sebba, Dr Alun Rees and Di McNeish

This report presents an overview of eight projects in the Innovation Programme that focused specifically on groups of young people who were experiencing or at risk of experiencing child sexual exploitation (CSE) or mental health issues. The projects took differing approaches to support young people with complex needs, including testing residential facilities as an alternative to secure accommodation or mental health inpatient settings, working with family members and specialist foster carers to increase their understanding of CSE and their ability to manage risks, developing a new service model based on building supportive relationships, a bespoke outreach service, and out-of-hours support for families that included access to psychiatric and psychological services. It is underpinned by a social pedagogic approach.

What is meant by social pedagogical research into children?

Foster CareInternationalYoung People

by Klaus Wolf, University of Siegen

The way in which foster children grow up and develop is a subject dealt with by various disciplines with widely varying epistemological positions and research methods. In many countries, there are well-developed, well-established clinical research methods based on medical and psychiatric paradigms. This article on social pedagogical research into foster children will present a different research programme developed over the past ten years by the University of Siegen’s Foster Care Research Group. While this will by no means replace clinical research, it will add another perspective to the interdisciplinary professional discussion.

Therapeutic approaches to social work in residential child care settings

CareResidential Child CareUK

by Prof Geraldine Macdonald, Dr Sharon Millen and Dr Mark McCann from the Institute of Child Care Research and Hannah Roscoe and Dr Shirley Ewart-Boyle from the Social Institute for Excellence

Following a regional review of residential child care in 2007, the five Health and Social Care (HSC) Trusts in Northern Ireland introduced „therapeutic approaches‟ in a number of children’s homes and in the regional secure units. The aim was to improve staff skills and outcomes for young people.

This report gives the results of an evaluation of these approaches.

Loud and clear foster family learning: an early years evaluation

EducationFoster CareUK

by Jenny Young and Eleanor Mooney

Loud and Clear was a project to support the musical development of Looked After Children and carers and to support the personal, social and emotional development of the children and their relationships with others.

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